Rescued Roses

I went to Costco today. Its amazing how cheap roses are after Valentine’s Day.

I saw these, 24 in total. I made 3 lovely displays and scattered them about the house.

It was amazing how quickly they perked up and showed off.

Good for them.

You don’t need a holiday to be beautiful.

Roses bloom where they are, shouldn’t we do the same?

The first Bluebonnets

The Bluebonnets in Texas are really prevalent in late March and early April. To my surprise we got a little peek today at lunch.

So happy to see the happy flower showing up earlier than expected.

Ron Niebrugge photographer captured a stunning view.

Hedy, What a woman

LHiggins does wonderful book reviews, and when I saw this one, my reaction was immediate! I ordered the book. The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict. I had to. I’ve admired this woman’s spunk, and beauty since I saw her in Bing Crosby/Bob Hope films when I was little. Mel Brooks gives her a nod in Blazing Saddles. He expounds on his love of Hedy in a documentary on Netflix. He was definitely a big fan of the Sultry Austrian, Spy, Inventor, Patriot, Actress, Sex Symbol.

Hedy Lamarr was one of the most amazing badass in female history. A flawed woman, for sure. I’m not sure she was ever really happy, but her contributions are undeniable.

Here’s a Facebook post from This Day in History that sums up some of her accomplishments with full credit to Jody Abraham.

On this day in 2000, Hedy Lamarr passes away. She was a well-known actress—but also a scientist who made a huge contribution to the technological revolution. You rely upon her work every day when you use your cell phone. She’s even been called the “Mother of Wi-Fi.”

Nevertheless, many today have no idea what she accomplished.

Lamarr wasn’t born Hedy Lamarr. Her name at birth was Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler. She was born in Vienna, spent a brief period acting, then married Friedrich Mandl, a military arms merchant. Lamarr was basically a prisoner in her own marriage, but she also spent time around her husband’s business, learning about military and radio technologies. She would use this knowledge later.

In the meantime, Lamarr escaped and fled to Paris. Then she moved to Hollywood where she became a successful movie star and the “world’s most beautiful woman”!

But behind the scenes, she was an inventor.

“Inventing was her hobby,” the producer of the documentary Bombshell told a reporter. “It was her reflex. It was how she dealt with the problems of the world. And she did it in such a quiet way that most people around her didn’t even know.”

Except Howard Hughes knew. At one point, Hughes was trying to build a faster plane, and he talked to Lamarr about it. Lamarr found books about birds and fish, researching which were the fastest and why. Ultimately, she proposed a wing shape for Hughes’s planes that was based upon what she’d learned.

Hughes pronounced her work “genius.”

In the scientific arena, she is perhaps best known for the “secret communications system” that she developed with composer George Antheil.

Both wanted to contribute to the Nazis’ defeat. Could they improve the way in which torpedoes were delivered? At the time, remember, torpedoes couldn’t be effectively guided. Radio communications between submarine and torpedo were difficult because communications could be intercepted or jammed by the enemy. But Lamarr had an idea: Instead of using one frequency to communicate with the torpedo, the military could use multiple frequencies in a coordinated fashion. A system of “frequency hopping,” would leave the enemy stumped.

Antheil’s contribution to the process? He had previously created an automated piano player. It was now adapted to make Lamarr’s idea work.

The two inventors obtained a patent for their work in August 1942—then they gave the patent to the United States Navy. Astoundingly, the Navy didn’t take the invention too seriously at first. They maintained that a player piano wouldn’t fit inside a torpedo, ignoring suggestions that the components could be made smaller. Or did they simply look at Lamarr’s beautiful face and get sidetracked? They urged her to sell war bonds instead.

Patriot that she was, Lamarr did exactly that.

Today, Lamarr’s technology is considered a precursor to the “spread-spectrum” wireless communications technology used in cell phones and other modern devices.

There is a lot more to Lamarr’s story, of course. Hollywood left its mark on her. She suffered when her beauty faded. She had difficult relationships with her children. She got married (and divorced) too many times. But she wouldn’t want to be remembered for any of that.

She’d surely be much more satisfied to hear that she was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.

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If you enjoy these history posts, please know that it is important to LIKE, SH☺RE & COMMENT. This site’s algorithm will weed these posts out of your news feed if you do not interact with them. (I don’t make the rules! Just following them.) 😉

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2019 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook

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#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty #freedom #ShareTheHistory — with Jody Abraham.

The book The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict was a lighter read than I anticipated, done in Novel form from the perspective of Hedy.

I hope you give it a try!

Trial runs

In the pre-planning stages of Christmas, and my husband’s birthday we have Beef Wellington! It’s my first stab at this recipe. My lucky husband and children get to experiment with me.

I added a bit of sautéed greens, and a little red wine reduction to bring it all together.

Cooking is one of those things that I really enjoy, especially when it works!

Me and Santa

Yes, I still watch all the Christmas animation from my youth.

I remember the first time I saw the Abominable Snowman in the Rudolph The Red-nosed Reindeer animated show, and ran and hid in the kitchen.

My dad would even climb up on the roof to put carrots out for Santa’s Reindeer while my mom and I put cookies out on a plate for him.

The anticipation of Christmas morning was always too much. I would have the house awake before dawn to see what Santa had brought.

When my brother was big enough to understand Santa, he and I would build a pillow fort and “sleep” in the same room. We didn’t sleep much, as we would wonder aloud what Santa was like, and if the sound in the hall was him, and what the reindeer were like.

I don’t think I have ever admitted publicly that I don’t believe in Santa anymore, because deep down inside I still do….primarily because I became Santa for my children, and I hope to keep that Spirit of Giving alive.

I met my husband at a Christmas Party in 1991, when he was talking to one of my Realtors about ‘Who Played the Snowman on Rudolph?’ I sidled up to the conversation and said, ‘Well, that would be Burl Ives’. We have been together ever since.

Santa Claus is part of me, always. The Spirit of Giving, the wonder of Children, but the essence of God, who gives. Our Father who gave his only begotten Son, Jesus. The reason we get to enjoy the beauty of Giving.

A great reminder

Expectations are things that trip me up.

I’m not sure why I have fallen back into expectations, but I got a good kick in the pants and it’s time to get back to appreciation and gratitude.

Expectations put an unnecessary pressure to situations, and I have found that they also limit my ability to appreciate.

I’m starting off with a fresh perspective this morning.

I’m so grateful for the kick in the pants that woke me up from expectations and reminded me to appreciate the gifts in front of me.

Have you ever been grateful for a kick in the pants?

Windows open

That first really fine day of fall,

Full of mellow sunshine and fresh breezes.

Open the windows and let the fall air work it’s wonders.

78 degrees, and the sun is so mellow

My confused Lemon tree is still very happy.

Today, I’m so grateful to open the windows, clean all ceiling fans, the base boards, and change all the sheets.

A refreshing day, that is for sure.

I have a small family

Nobody left from my parent’s generation for my niece and nephew.

Just me and my brother for our generation from our family.

I woke up today thinking of my niece and nephew. They may not have grandparents, but they have an Aunt Wendy.

I found some fun costumes for play on Amazon and sent them out.

My niece M modeling the chefs costume I sent out. She’s a very serious cook!

Mid-Century Modern

This cool old stove is in my Mother-in-law’s house, which will soon go on the market. She’s enjoying her assisted living home, thank goodness. I’m so happy she is doing well. She’s gained some weight, she gets to go to Mass every day, play dominos with several of her cousins, and she’s across the street from her sister, brother, and brother-in-law. All good things.

My husband wants to keep the stove from his mom’s house for our place in the country. I think it’s charming. It’s a little time capsule.

The more I look at it, the more I like it. If it can be converted to use propane, I think it will be a done deal.

Isn’t it charming?